The Lord's Prayer during The Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon On the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch.

Event: The Lord’s Prayer
Location: Galilee
When: Second Galilean Ministry of Jesus
Scriptural Reference: Matt. 6: 9-13, Luke 11: 2- 4


The Lord’s Prayer is perhaps the best-known prayer in Christianity. The prayer occurs as part of the Sermon on the Mount when the Savior asked His followers to avoid “vain repetitions” and to pray “after this manner.” Thus, the Lord’s Prayer serves as a pattern to follow and not as a piece to memorize and recite repetitively.

Here is the full text of the Lord’s Prayer as recorded in the Gospel of Matthew:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Here is the full text of the Lord’s Prayer as recorded in the Gospel of Luke:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.
Give us day by day our daily bread.
And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

Addressing Our Father in Heaven

Though the two versions of the Lord’s Prayer are not identical, both open with a salutation to “Our Father,” signifying a close relationship between God and His children. The phrase “hallowed be thy name” reflects the respect and worshipful attitude that we should feel as we pray.

Daily Bread and the Bread of Life

His request for “daily bread” includes a need for spiritual nourishment as well. Jesus, who called Himself “the bread of life,” gave a promise: “He that cometh to me shall never hunger.” (see John 6:35)

Forgiveness

The prophet Joseph Smith provided the following clarification on the statement about forgiveness. In his inspired translation of the Bible, that verse reads “Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.” The clarification on forgiveness is supported by other statements of the Master. He said to His servants, “Inasmuch as you have forgiven one another your trespasses, even so I, the Lord, forgive you.” (see D&C 82:1) In other words, if one is to be forgiven, one must first forgive.

Temptation

The prophet Joseph Smith also added clarification around the statement on temptation. In his inspired translation of the Bible, that verse reads “Suffer us not to be led into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” The clarification on temptation is helpful, for surely we would not be led into temptation by God. The Lord said, “Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation.” (see Matthew 26:41)

Closing His Prayer

As the Jesus closes His prayer, He acknowledges God’s great power and glory, ending with “Amen.” In the Church, we also close our prayers with amen. Adding amen solemnly affirms a sermon or a prayer; it means “truly” or “verily.” Those who concur with what has been said should also add an audible amen to signify it is your solemn declaration too. (see Psalm 106:48)


Additional Resources

Lessons from the Lord’s Prayers by Russell M. Nelson